Alignment

This page will be a brief set of ramblings on the subject of alignment and how it works in this campaign, and in my D&D campaigns generally.

I tend to take alignment verbatim out of the books. As a consequence, unlike some campaigns, in this one it is particularly important to note that Lawful Good is not any more “good” than Chaotic Good. A chaotic good character, for example, who voluntarily tortures a prisoner is just as likely to lose his good alignment as a lawful good character. In fact, if the torture in question is taking place under the aegis of a judicial system, the chaotic good character is in more danger of losing his alignment than the lawful good character.

Based on the alignment graph we can take law to mean an ethos that emphasizes the importance of groups and hierarchies above that of individuals, while chaos has the opposite emphasis. Good emphasizes actions that benefit others, while evil emphasizes benefiting oneself at the expense of others.

Alignment

The Survivors of Lemuria alinman